Sonic Science

In creating the best sounds to wake our sleeping brains, we looked to a new kind of music informed by science.

We partnered with a Sonic Strategist (yes, that’s a thing) to sift through mountains of research to find the best tones, tempos, frequencies, structures, and instruments to wake you up. In the end, we took everything we learned and arranged it into a detailed sonic brief for musicians to use when composing music for OneClock.

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To summarize the sonic brief, waking music has the following characteristics:

  • Soft to Loud(er)

    Our waking music gently increases in volume, fading in over 30 seconds.

  • Gradual

    Compositions slowly build in intensity to minimize stressing the nervous system.

  • Strong Melody

    Our brains are hardwired to hear melodies, which produce less sleep inertia in comparison to neutral sounds.

  • Natural

    OneClock incorporates analog instrumentation like woodwinds, brass, strings, harmonics, percussion, and the human voice.

  • Generative

    Humans are susceptible to alarm fatigue. OneClock randomizes its songs, and also makes subtle changes to the EQ to keep your brain engaged.

  • Range

    Hearing is highly subjective. Our tones range between 200-1000hz, where most human speech falls.

  • Soft to Loud(er)

    Our waking music gently increases in volume, fading in over 30 seconds.

    Strong Melody

    Our brains are hardwired to hear melodies, which produce less sleep inertia in comparison to neutral sounds.

  • Natural

    OneClock incorporates analog instrumentation like woodwinds, brass, strings, harmonics, percussion, and the human voice.

    Generative

    Humans are susceptible to alarm fatigue. OneClock randomizes its songs, and also makes subtle changes to the EQ to keep your brain engaged.

  • Gradual

    Compositions slowly build in intensity to minimize stressing the nervous system.

    Range

    Hearing is highly subjective. Our tones range between 200-1000hz, where most human speech falls.

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